Race Communications’ Summer Review.

2018 has been filled with releases, events, and expansion for Race Communications. In May, the company officially opened a new office in Tehachapi, CA where the company has a strong fiber footprint in the outlying communities of Stallion Springs, Brite Valley, Oak Knolls and Bear Valley Springs. Race has hired several local residents to build their marketing and sales team and is revving up their efforts in their service areas in the High Desert and Central Valley.

The month of May also brought the release of the first part of the “Gigafy Phelan” project, a hard-fought project that was approved in July 2017, after years of challenges and obstacles.

Since June 2018, Race has installed 98% of the residents who had previously inquired about service in the released zone – the release came two full months ahead of the initial target date of August 2018. “Gigafy Phelan” was not the only project to be released – the “Gigafy Occidental” project in Northern California was also released and installs began immediately. At this time over 70 percent of the community has signed up for services from Race.

The release of these communities has given Race the momentum to continue their expansion and Race opened a new field operations office in Phelan, CA and marked the occasion with a BBQ Kick-Off and ribbon cutting ceremony on June 21st. The company was recognized by Congressman Cook’s office for their efforts in the area and for their continued work in rural unserved and underserved areas across the state.

 

Race looks forward to the second half of 2018 and continued progress. Race is on a mission to provide affordable high-speed broadband to the communities where larger carriers have ignored the needs of the residents. Race will continue to support net-neutrality, promote broadband access and adoption, and will continue to seek out new projects in unserved and underserved regions in California.

Finally, a big THANK YOU to those who have chosen Race as their new service provider as we could not have done this without you. Our customers are part of the Race family, and we look forward to providing our customers with the newest technology and the friendly customer service they have come to know.  Stay tuned for more exciting news from Race as the year progresses!

 

What is fiber optics and why is it better than copper?

Today, your Internet and TV services are probably connected to your home via copper wires. This technology has been around for over a hundred years, and it certainly wasn’t built for today’s uses and demands. Race Communications recognizes this and is working to build a network that will provide fiber optic internet to homes across the state of California. Now you may be wondering, what is fiber optic technology and is it better than copper? If so, why?

Fiber optic technology is far better and faster than copper at transmitting information, such as the bits that make up your favorite websites, Netflix shows, or online games. Fiber-optic cables are made of glass, and they use lasers to transmit information — close to the speed of light!

Investing in fiber-optic networks can significantly increase bandwidth potential and reliability. As mentioned earlier, copper infrastructure is limited because it was originally designed for transmitting the telegram! Think about that! The same infrastructure has been in use since the telegram – no wonder most homeowners are familiar with the slowdown that occurs when the clock hits 6:00 pm and everyone is home from work.

The signal for copper networks degrades as the signal is carried from the central office (CO) so distance is a huge factor in your internet’s performance. In contrast, when traveling over a long distance, fiber optic cables experience less signal loss than copper cabling. This is known as low attenuation. It is estimated that fiber loses only three percent signal strength going over 320 feet in distance. By contrast, copper loses 94 percent over the same distance.

While not everyone needs gigabit — or 1,000 megabits per second — the move to faster speeds is inevitable, and more companies are trying to offer these services, just look at Spectrum and Comcast. However, these providers do not use fiber optic technology and instead rely on the old copper wires. This means that the speeds will rarely (if ever) be symmetrical, data caps will apply and reliability will be an issue.

There are a number of factors that can cause outages when a company relies on a copper network – temperature fluctuations, severe weather conditions, and moisture can all cause a loss of connectivity. Old or worn copper cable can even present a fire hazard, due to the fact it carries an electric current – since fiber is made of glass it doesn’t present the same hazard!

Fiber optics is an amazing technology, but unfortunately, very few homes have direct access to fiber networks today. This is in large part due to the resource-intensive process of deploying new infrastructure – but Race Communications hasn’t let that slow us down, thanks to grants and partnerships with public and private entities!

If you are lucky enough to live in one of our fiber communities, don’t hesitate!

Submit an inquiry today to find out if you live in our fiber footprint (or if we are coming to a neighborhood near you soon) – or give us a call at 877-722-3833 to place your order!

Sources:
https://smallbiztrends.com/2015/08/fiber-optic-copper-wireless-internet-transmission-methods.html
https://www.atlantech.net/blog/8-advantages-of-fiber-optic-internet-over-copper-cable

Never Fear! Race Continues to Support Net Neutrality

In May 2017, Race Communications ensured our customers that we would support Net Neutrality.  Even though the rules and regulations on how the internet runs has changed we continue that promise.  Though this topic has become very political in nature, being a smaller internet service provider who will continue to protect our customers’ privacy and not throttle their internet speeds is beneficial for Race Communications, our customers and the internet as whole.  

raceralph

Race Communications has stood by the mission of providing service to underserved communities and to those communities that larger providers have long ignored.  It would only make sense for Race to continue support Net Neutrality and not let our services be affected by this change in regulations.  Be happy that you are a Race customer! If you don’t have Race and are in our service area, call our team at 877-722-3833 or visit www.race.com to get started today.  

The Fiber Path to Your Home

Race_The Fiber Path to Your Home_2

Many Race Customers are very happy with their internet speeds once they get installed.  Here’s a simple infographic showing how fiber is connected to your home.
Remember: Fiber-optic is NOT like copper wiring that most internet service providers use.  With Fiber, customers do not lose broadband speed or capacity during peak usage times like with copper.  Your home will have a dedicated internet signal with symmetrical download and upload speeds.
  1. Fiber Optic cable is run via an aerial or underground drop to the “clamshell” which is installed outside of the home.
  2. The “clamshell” unit on the outside of the home houses the fiber cable that is run through the wall and connected to the Optical Network Terminal (ONT).
  3. The ONT converts the laser light signal from the fiber into an electrical signal.  CAT 5 or 6 cable is then run from the ONT to the router.
  4. If using our Race router, you will be able to hardwire devices using CAT 5 or 6 cable or utilize it’s 2 channel WiFi signal to connect to the internet.
Share, Like and Comment! Get Gigafied Today!. 

Tips: Underground Conduit Placement 👷

Some of our Race customers require Underground Conduit Placement in order to run fiber-optic to the home.  We at Race want to ensure that our customers have the information they need to make this a smooth process and have provided the following specifications to help.  The homeowner/developer/contractor is responsible for providing and adhering to the following underground requirements set by Race.

Remember that you can always call us at 877-722-3833 for any assistance.       

Scheduling ⏰

  • RACE needs to submit permit to Pole Owner and permit approved before any of these specifications can be executed.
  • Prior to the installation of any conduit, a RACE Communications Field Engineer will need to be scheduled to verify conduit route, pole conduit stub out, and home stub out.
  • A RACE Communications Field Engineer will need to be scheduled for conduit inspection before trench fill. Two days advance notice must be provided prior to conduit inspection, with a three day inspection window.
  • It is the homeowner / developer / contractor’s responsibility to contact “Call Before You Dig” prior to any excavation. 
  • It is the homeowner / developer / contractor’s responsibility to contact local building department for any permitting requirements.
  • RACE Communications will reserve the right to refuse fiber installation if any of these specifications are not met.
  • A scaled print of the project showing the lot layout. To be reviewed with RACE Communications Field Engineer.

Dimension 📐

  • Any conduit run under 250’ will require 3/4 inch Schedule 40 PVC conduit.*
  • For any run between 251’ and 400’, it will require a 3/4 inch Schedule 40 PVC conduit with a pull box.*
  • Any conduit run over 400’ will require a pull box location.
  • All conduits, sweeps, and couplers will be glued with PVC cement.
  • Sweeps are to be utilized at any splice location, riser pole, or structure. No Hard 90 degree bends to be used. A maximum of 3 sweeps in conduit run. 
  • All conduit runs to have ¼” nylon pull rope installed within it. Both ends of rope should be secured to outside of conduit and accessible.
  • Conduit at pole location will need to be stubbed up 2’ minimum.
  • Conduit at structure location will need to be stubbed up 4’ minimum.
  • Conduit install depth on private property is 12 – 18 inches. Please contact local building department for required private property depth based on county specifications. 
  • *note: you will not be able to run additional wires or cables in the same conduit should you use a 3/4 inch conduit. Underground Conduit Placement Specifications