Face to Face with Race: Eva Borras

When you get your welcome call from Race Communications, have you ever wondered who’s on the other end? Most likely, you’re speaking with San Francisco native Eva Borras, who loves giving customers the best service. Read more to find out how she spends her days at Race.

How long have you been at Race?

I have been at Race for a year and one month.

What’s your official title?

I believe it’s called Customer Service Representative [laughs].

What exactly do you do at Race?

I take inbound calls that are non-technical. I’m really not technically inclined…so I  leave that to the guys [laughs]. I can schedule installations, I do all of the Welcome Calls for the new orders that come into the cue.

I do a lot of spreadsheet maintenance to keep the team up to date. I do order completions as it gets closer to the end of the month. Sometimes, things get overlooked and I go through the orders and provisions in the install cue, to make sure any order that has been completed, really has been completed.

I also do line number porting [which is how customers are able to keep their home number when they switch from providers].

And then, anything else that may come up, but roughly that’s everything I do off the top of my head.

What’s your typical day like?

My typical day is usually very busy. I mean I’m always busy and if I’m not busy, I’m looking into the system to find things that may need to be corrected or updated. All of us are moving so quickly, and there are things that go by the waist side, so I’m always on the search to correct things.

Whether I’m busy with outside info, calls and all that, I am finding things to do to make sure that everything we’re doing is top notch.

What three words can you use to describe Race?

That is a hard one [laughs]. I have more words than three. I knocked it down to: We are definitely awesome, progressive. We are competitive, reliable and friendly. That’s what I think of Race.

Bonus Question: What’s your favorite movie?

You’re going to laugh. It’s an older movie. It’s the 3-D animation, it’s called Up. If you haven’t seen it, go see it. I cried during the whole movie. It was wonderful. It brings out the sentimentality of life and what we’re here for.

RACE is coming!

The weather couldn’t have been more perfect on Saturday when RACE held their informational meeting for Bear Valley Springs residents. Perhaps that is what lead to such a great turn out, or perhaps it was due to the fact that the community is in such need for reliable broadband services and RACE seems to be the solution residents have been waiting for. Lead by CEO, Raul Alcaraz, the meeting provided a lot of helpful information for the community.

Alcaraz explained in detail why certain areas are not included in the maps found online and how the project areas are determined using standards set by the CPUC. The area removed from the initial application includes the top of Bear Valley (Deertrail, Paramount, Starland). However, RACE hopes to provide service to this area in the future as a 100% self-funded project. Alcaraz also dispelled rumors that the funds granted to the company were running out and that the company WILL be providing service to the areas shown in the service maps found on the company website.

RACE has awarded contracts to local contractors to begin the buildout of the project starting by their POP (point-of-presence) right outside Stallion Springs on Banducci. Construction crews will begin working down Banducci up Pellisier and along 202 making their way to the gate of Bear Valley Springs. Residents in the area can expect to see crews working within the next 2-3 weeks, and RACE hopes to begin installs in the area in late fall of 2016.

Attendees pointed out the missed deadlines set forth by RACE previously, and RACE understands the frustrations. RACE is building brand-new infrastructure and as is to be expected with construction, delays can and have occurred, especially in regards to permits and unexpected issues such as replacement of utility poles. Based on previous experience with other communities such as Boron and Stallion Springs, the expected timeline to have all zones up and running in Bear Valley Springs is 8-16 months.

Bear Valley Springs has been divided into 12 zones (not including Cummings Valley and Fairview Ranches). To see the zones and their designated borders, please visit our zoomable map or see below:

BearValley

For more information on construction questions regarding homes, visit our FAQ page at www.race.com/faq.

From concept to reality. How Fiber is brought to your home

Race Communications specializes in building fiber infrastructure in unserved and underserved communities in California. Fiber to the home (FTTH) is a large endeavor and requires a multifaceted construction process. You may see our trucks driving around town, but that doesn’t mean we are ready to install just yet.

Please take a look at our infographic below to see the process behind bringing fiber to our new communities and markets.

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The value of Fiber Internet

When someone goes house-hunting, they have their needs, their wants, and their deal-breakers. In addition to good schools, low crime and a nice location, high-speed internet service, is becoming more of a need than a want.

Cities and towns across the country are beginning to see next generation internet access as a necessity, citing its impact on property values, rents, and overall economic health.

Take Provo, Utah, for instance. With the introduction of gigabit internet (provided by Google Fiber), residents are seeing faster internet, more reliable service, and increased home values. The median price of a home in Provo in 2014 was $182,750, an increase of over 15% in 2011 when homes were selling for a median price of $158,950.

Ashley Jensen, a successful real estate agent in Provo, has seen a lot of positive changes in her city the last few years, including a complete renovation of the city’s downtown area and many new businesses. Since 2011, the number of homes sold in Provo have increased by 26%. Ms. Jensen attributes this to new mayor, John Curtis and the business boom brought on in part by better connectivity.

In addition to increased home value, a study by the FTTH council suggests that gigabit internet may have a positive impact in other areas such as a decrease in unemployment, improving medical technology and creating new education applications.

Studies have shown that students with broadband at home study more, watch less television, and improve their grades. With fiber internet, teachers and lecturers could simulcast their lessons to a classroom across town – or across the country. With the advent of 3D broadcasting, imagine if students could inspect a visualizations of the planets orbiting the sun in the solar system, projected right out into their classroom.

Jensen says she has seen an influx of Silicon Valley transplants to the area, and believes they are choosing to live in Provo because of the city’s innovative spirit and desire to provide the right tools and resources for success to it’s residents and businesses.

Download a copy of the study here.