Moving to Lancaster, CA? Everything You Need Is In This All-Inclusive Guide

Are you moving to Lancaster, CA? Then this blog is just what you need to make your move a success. Lancaster, CA is one of the best places to live in the US. It’s located just north of Los Angeles, nestled in the western Mojave desert’s Antelope Valley. 

Recently. The growing city recently claimed a spot on the Top 100 Places to Live. Livability awarded Lancaster a spot due to its thriving economy, a community rich in culture and diversity, and dedication to environmental protection. In addition, this growing city is one of the more affordable places the golden state offers, and the sun is always shining.

In case you haven’t heard, Race Communications is excited to bring our network and high-speed fiber internet to Lancaster in the fall of 2022. In celebration of this, we are bringing you a guide to moving to Lancaster. Here are some helpful tips and everything you need to know about moving to Lancaster. By the end of this blog, you’ll feel like a local! 

Moving to Lancaster, CA Poppy Field

Population

Lancaster is currently home to a population of 160K residents (give or take). 

Weather

Lancaster is in the Mojave desert. The hot season ranging from June to September is hot and arid, with daily temps rising well into the 90s. Winter lasts from late November to March, with mild daytime temperature in the 60-70s, dropping at night into the 30s. 

Cost of Living 

Compared to most cities in California, Lancaster is a relatively affordable place to live but still only 73 miles outside of LA. The median household income is $55,237, and the median home price is $385,400. This price may seem high to some moving from other areas but keep in mind that California has a median home price of $834,000, so it’s much lower than the state average!

Moving to Lancaster, CA Sustainability

Sustainability Practices

The city has been working towards a more sustainable future since 1994 when the City Council adopted the Blue Skies Program and a resolution to use alternative fuels whenever possible. Ever since these programs came into place, the city has continued to develop environmentally friendly practices. 

To date, 22% of the city’s fleet of cars and pickups run on alternative fuel. Lancaster also practices water conservation by implementing xeriscaping and other ordinances to combat water wasting and encourage minimum water use. The city has won many awards for its efforts, including the prestigious World Energy Global Award.

moving to Lancaster, CA school districts

Lancaster, CA School Districts 

There are three major school districts in the city: the Lancaster School District, Eastside Union School District, and Antelope Valley High School District. Each district provides outstanding educational opportunities. 

The Lancaster School District spans 82.5 square miles, most of which lies within the city of Lancaster. The district is home to more than 15,000 students from preschool to 12th grade. Their mission is to provide a relevant, high-quality education within an inclusive and culturally respectful environment that prepares all students for personal and professional success. 

Eastside Union School District is Antelope Valley’s older school district. The district goes by the vision “Everyone contributes, every student achieves.” This school district is much smaller than other districts consisting of four elementary schools, one middle school, and one transitional learning center. However, the district is growing and excited about its future. 

Antelope Valley High School District is unique because it only consists of high schools. The district is made of eight traditional and three alternative high schools, plus SOAR, the early college high school on the Antelope Valley College Campus. The district also has online learning programs. There are 23,000 students in this district from Palmdale and Lancaster. Antelope Valley’s vision is to make sure every student who graduates will be prepared to pursue college and any career they aspire to. 

Moving to Lancaster, CA The BLVD

Things to Do 

There are many activities and places to see right in Lancaster. Let’s explore a few of our favorites below. 

The Famous California Poppy Festival

Lancaster is well known for the California Poppy Festival, which is set to return after two years with an even bigger event lasting three days to celebrate the vibrant state flower. The festival will boast live entertainment, amusement park rides, and activities for the whole family. 

Saddleback Butte State Park

If you’re a nature enthusiast, this next destination is for you. Saddleback Butte State Park is located in the high-desert just fifteen miles east of Lancaster.. In the state park, you’ll find Joshua Trees, desert plants, and animals surrounding the Saddleback Butte. In addition, the state part provides areas for hiking, camping, and 360-degree views of Antelope Valley and the Mojave Desert. 

The Lancaster Museum of Art and History 

Head to the Lancaster Museum of Art and History if you appreciate art. The museum holds a collection of over 10,000 artworks and artifacts, many of which celebrate the history of Southern California. MOAH also produces community-oriented programming that engages diverse audiences. Additionally, check out the Lancaster Performing Arts Center provides world-class entertainment to the city’s residents and is the largest performing arts center in Antelope Valley.

Hit the BLVD

The BLVD Cultural District has been the heart of culture in Antelope Valley since the 1800s. Packed with colorful murals and rich history, the district is home to innovative green initiatives, including electric vehicle charging stations and solar waste compactors. This bustling district is also home to a growing number of events, including weekly farmers’ markets and concerts. In addition, there are many locally-owned businesses and exciting restaurants to experience on the BLVD! 

Close Proximity to Major SoCal Cities

While Lancaster has a lot to keep you entertained, the city is also close in proximity to many other urban hubs. For example, Los Angeles is only 2 hours away, and San Diego is about 3 hours away. If you want to head to the ocean, Santa Monica Beach is the closest. Need a family getaway? Disneyland is just 2.5 hours away! 

Final Thoughts

Lancaster is a great place to live. It’s a thriving city full of things to do, great local culture, and is close to other major destinations in California!

If you are moving to the city and in need of reliable and fast internet, inquire now to join our waitlist! We’d love to help take your internet services to the next level. Contact our specialists at 877-722-3833 or send us an inquiry to be the first to know when Race is available in your part of town!

What Does It Take To Get Fiber In Your City?

High-speed internet allows businesses and residents alike to connect to the world. In addition, faster internet will improve your online experience for education, businesses, and entertainment. At Race, we are committed to bringing high-quality, affordable internet infrastructure to communities across the state of California.

However, before our fiber network becomes available to the community, there are several steps that need to take place. Bringing our services such as fiber internet into communities is an in-depth project that takes extensive research and planning, not to mention the actual building of the network and infrastructure. Today we are giving you a behind-the-scenes look and breaking down what it takes for Race to come to your community. Let’s go!

What is internet infrastructure? 

Before we get into how to build an internet infrastructure, let’s define it. Internet infrastructure is the framework of the internet. It’s made of physical hardware, transmission media, software, and cables that connect everyone to the internet. The infrastructure essentially hosts, stores, and possesses all the information and content you find on websites, cloud services, and applications. It is the heart of the internet. 

18 Months Out – Research and Exploration Begins

This development phase typically begins 12-18 months out from the time the internet is available to the community. During this phase, Race creates a construction plan for the communities. This phase explores exactly how we’ll bring high-speed internet to the city. We work to develop the project in partnership with local authorities. During this phase, we cover permitting and review infrastructure. This covers everything from where roads are located, researching underground utility paths, finding utility easements, and uncovering potential challenges.

9-12 Months Out – Design Begins 

9-12 months out from the launch of services Race enters the design phase. During this phase, our engineers and design team partner with the city to plan out the network. Every inch of our network is carefully planned using data we gathered during our research phase. Our engineers create a map of where we can build based on existing infrastructure and map out obstacles such as existing utility poles, water, gas, and electric lines. 

6-9 Months Out – Construction Begins

The plans are now complete, and it’s time to get to work! Our crews hit the ground during construction and get straight to work laying and splicing miles of fiber cables. This is the time you’ll see our team members out on your street. The team is working diligently to bring you some of the fastest internet in the nation at a great price! 

The construction phase is most vulnerable to outside factors that can delay or stretch out this timeline. Like any construction, Race can be heavily impacted by weather, permitting, and resources. This is especially true while the global supply chain is disrupted due to the pandemic. 

9 Months Out – Spreading The Word

Now that we know bringing high-speed internet to the community is possible, it’s time to make announcements. The announcements come around the same time as construction crews begin arriving in an area – usually around 9-12 months before the launch. Race begins to prepare the citizens for the arrival and announces the services to come. At this point, we build a community page on our website and publish a press release informing residents about the upcoming services and developments in their city or town. We develop pages with community-specific information and allow residents to subscribe to monthly newsletter updates. 

1 Month Out – Sign up 

Construction is now in its final stage. We are inching closer to bringing high-speed internet to the community! Once our building is almost complete, Race releases our order form for your region. This gives you the ability to choose the services you want for your home or business. 

Once services are chosen and construction is complete, we will begin the installation process. The installation process has its own unique steps based on your location so check with your customer service representative to find the process in your area.

Conclusion 

There you have it! It takes time to build a carefully thought out internet infrastructure, but the high-speed internet at the end is worth waiting for. We are committed to providing high-quality internet to communities throughout the country. If you are interested in learning more, check out our services to see what we offer in your area! 

GIGABIT vs. GIGABYTE – Why is everything so confusing?

Do you get confused when you hear gigabit, gigabyte or megabit? Do you scratch your head when you see abbreviations such as Mbps? If your answer is “Yes” to any of these questions, rest assured you are not alone. We at Race understand this can be confusing, especially for those of you who live in unserved or underserved communities where broadband has been non-existent and we are here to help you navigate through this new terminology.

Many people confuse the terms “gigabit” and “gigabyte” as well as the terms “megabit” and “kilobit”. While both “bit” and “byte” are units of measurement describing digital data, how much they measure and how they are used are different.

A bit is one of the most basic units used in telecommunications. A bit is considered data moving so when we’re talking about internet speeds, the correct term to use is bits per second. Race’s “Gigafy Me” plan provides speeds up to 1Gbps, one gigabit (or a thousand megabits) per second.

Meanwhile, bytes are generally used when describing data capacity such as hard drive storage. One Byte equals 8bits. We measure the sizes of our files and the hard drives that store them in megabytes, gigabytes, and terabytes. 

When we need to refer to numbers of bits or bytes as those numbers get larger and larger, we use the prefixes from the metric system (see table below for examples).

prefix multiplier bits-to-bytes bytes-to-bits
kilo- (K) 1,000x 1Kb = 125B 1KB = 8Kb
mega- (M) 1,000,000x 1Mb = 125KB 1MB = 8Mb
giga- (G) 1,000,000,000x 1Gb = 125MB 1GB = 8Gb
tera- (T) 1,000,000,000,000x 1Tb = 125GB 1TB = 8Tb
Source: Atlantic.net

To distinguish between the two when abbreviating them, the lower-case “b” traditionally represents “bit”, whereas the upper-case “B” represents “byte”. Bytes are generally used when describing data capacity. We measure the sizes of our files and the hard drives that store them in gigabytes and terabytes (and, perhaps soon, petabytes!).

This can get confusing for many, especially if they are switching from a satellite or wireless provider that sells their packages based on usage, not speed. With Race, you are never charged for usage and you can rest assured that we won’t be throttling your speed after a certain amount of data is used. With us, you simply pay for the speed you want – and we make selecting a plan as easy as possible.

We offer 25Mbps as our Basic Broadband+ package and 1Gbps (1,000Mbps) as our “Gigafy Me” package. Both packages offer symmetrical speeds which means you are getting the same speed for your uploads and your downloads!

How fast is 1000Mbps or 125MB/s is in terms of usage?
Below are examples of files with the average download duration:

  • MP3 file — 3MB, less than 1 second
  • TV episode — 350MB, 3 seconds
  • 720p High Definition TV episode — 950MB, 8 seconds
  • Blu-Ray Movie — 15GB, 2 minutes
Source: myrepublic.com

This post was originally published in July of 2018, and was updated in August of 2021.

What You Need To Know About Utility Easements

Did you know that you may have several types of utility lines running under or over your land as a property owner?For example, electric, gas or telecommunications lines like those used by Race Communications. If these lines exist, a utility company can access them if there’s a problem, and that means they can go onto your property to do so. Here’s what you should know about utility easements and what you can expect as a property owner.

Firstly, while you may own the land, but utility companies will have the right to use your land to access their equipment
: Utility easements are usually written into your deed. If you’re not sure if there’s an easement on your property, it’s best to do a title search to find out. A utility easement will transfer with the land, or “run with the land”—that is, if you sell your house, the next owner buys your house and land with the easement on it. Sometimes there’s nothing in writing showing a utility easement, but an easement is usually implied when you buy a house that comes with running water, cable, electricity or gas, and other utilities.

Property owners have the right to use the land as they see fit, including the easement area, so long as they’re not obstructing the easement itself. For example, if there’s a written easement for a company to use a small corridor along your property to access its equipment in the back, you can’t build anything on it or obstruct that corridor. If you do, the utility company can remove the obstruction or even destroy it if it interferes with the easement.

That doesn’t mean you can’t build a fence, or plant shrubs or flowers along the border, so long as they don’t interfere with the utility companies’ access to their equipment. Remember that your deed permits utility companies to access it whenever needed so that they can take you to court—they can ask the judge for an injunction to stop you from blocking entry onto your property—for violating the easement.

One way to avoid damage to utility lines placed on your property, is to call 811 before you dig! Race Communications recently shared a blog post on the importance of utility markings prior to kicking off any projects around your property. We hope we’ve been able to answer your questions on utility easements and what they mean for you as a property owner!

Thinking about breaking out your shovel?

Calling 811 can save you some trouble!

Race Communications recently experienced a major interruption in service throughout California due to a cut fiber line. Cut fiber lines tend to occur during this time of year as this glorious warm weather is a great motivator when it comes to getting home-improvement projects done!

Whether you’re finally getting around to fixing up the patio or you’re adding a new and improved garage or shed, calling 811 should be your very first step! You never know what may be lurking underground.

Water, gas, and electricity are just some of the utilities that may be underground on your property – not to mention your precious fiber lines for internet and phone services. Surely you wouldn’t want to disrupt your service (or your neighbor’s service)! In order to avoid a major headache in the form of a burst water pipe or electrical outage, be sure to call 811 at least two business days before you plan to dig. 

The 811 call center will then ensure that all public utilities are notified about the upcoming dig on your property. You may be asked to mark the area you plan to dig with white paint or white flags, which can be found at many hardware stores.

Then, each organization, either by themselves or via a hired third-party, will mark the area of each utility. Each type of utility has a different color so that you will know what is where. Not sure what the colors are? Here’s a quick recap:

The designated color for drinking water is blue; sewer is green, and gas, oil and steam are all marked yellow. Red is the color for electrical utilities and orange signifies communications – like internet, telephone and TV.

When you call 811, they will also mark for public utilities which are the ones that use the public right of way (or easement) to your house. You’ll need to keep an extra eye out for these as these lines could be responsible for providing service to entire neighborhoods.

So again, don’t break out that shovel before you make the call to 811! Be prepared that the representative will ask you some questions in order to process your request, including your address and nearby cross streets, city, county, the type and scope of the digging project, and a contact number. Now, what are you waiting for? Better get started on that “honey-do” list!